What does it mean to be “educated”?

Susan Santone at the Institude for Global Education Diplomacy ConferenceIn a world facing enormous environmental and social challenges, what does it mean to be “educated”, and what measures will we use to gauge this?

This was the question Executive Director Susan Santone posed to an international group of educators at the recent Institute for Global Education Diplomacy held Washington, DC. The Institute, sponsored by the Association for Childhood Education International, is a collaborative learning event focused on the emerging field of education diplomacy–the “cross-disciplinary, transnational sharing of theories, ideas, and concepts that advance education.” The three-day event brought together educators from every continent to share their expertise.

Santone’s session challenged participants to compare two views of education: one defined by test scores, and another that encompasses a child’s academic, social, emotional and physical development.

Comparing IndicatorsParticipants then examined indicators of success in each paradigm and how this drives educational policies. The consensus? Test-driven curriculum is an international problem, and educators want to see broader measures of success that emphasize global readiness, health, and emotional wellbeing. The challenge ahead is to get policymakers to listen.

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